a⋅cous⋅tics  [uh-koo-stiks] –noun

1. (used with a singular verb) Physics. the branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves.
2. (used with a plural verb) the qualities or characteristics of a room, auditorium, stadium, etc., that determine the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it.

As you can see from the above description, acoustics can be described as the behaviors of sound in itself as well as the behaviors of sound in an environment like a room. Sound travels at different speeds depending on what material it is being transmitted through and what state of condition that material is in. Read More…

Sound Treatment vs. Soundproofing

Contrary to popular belief, sound treatment and soundproofing are not the same process. Sound travels through large spaces as well as very small spaces and travels through walls, floors and other materials you would think would stop sound waves. When sound waves hit solid surfaces that reflect the majority of those sound waves, you have what is called reverberation. Reverberation is basically all of the echoes in a room combined, and in small areas, those echoes usually do not sound like an echo you would hear in a long hallway or large space like a gymnasium but instead a collision of sound waves making the sound unclear and often louder than the original source. Read More…

What is NRC, STC & SAA?

NRC – Noise Reduction Coefficients

The Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) is a scalar representation of the amount of sound energy absorbed upon striking a particular surface. An NRC of 0 indicates perfect reflection; an NRC of 1 indicates perfect absorption. In particular, it is the average of four sound absorption coefficients of the particular surface at frequencies of 250 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, and 2000 Hz. These frequencies encompass the fundamental frequencies and first few overtones of typical human speech, and, therefore, the NRC provides a decent and simple quantification of how well the particular surface will absorb the human voice. Read More…